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RUSSIAN EASTER BREAD

RUSSIAN EASTER BREAD

Kulich is a Russian Easter bread with a distinctive high cylinder shape that is traditionally served during Orthodox Easter celebrations. Its distinctive shape is due to the fact that the Russians used necessity, virtue, and recycled large cans of preserves as mold. Take a look at the tricks you’ve gotten.

Yield: 4

RUSSIAN EASTER BREAD

RUSSIAN EASTER BREAD RECIPE

Kulich is a Russian Easter bread with a distinctive high cylinder shape that is traditionally served during Orthodox Easter celebrations. Its distinctive shape is due to the fact that the Russians used necessity, virtue, and recycled large cans of preserves as mold. Take a look at the tricks you've gotten

Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 45 minutes
Additional Time 12 hours
Total Time 13 hours 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 50 ml of honey
  • 2 eggs
  • Zest of a lemon
  • 350 g of strength flour
  • A pinch of salt
  • 50 g sugar
  • A cdta. of vanilla extract
  • 125 g butter
  • 75 g of raisins sultanas
  • 50 g of Corinth raisins
  • 25 g candied orange
  • 50 g of raw almonds

Instructions

    1. In a mixing bowl, combine the strength flour, milk, and baker's yeast. Mix well and cover to ferment until it rises and becomes bubbly.
    2. Meanwhile, we make the dressings: crush the saffron in a mortar and place it in a bowl with the vodka to release the aromas in the alcohol. We remove the seeds from the cardamom pods and crush them in a mortar and pestle. Cut the almonds into bite-sized pieces.
    3. When the preferment is finished, combine the vodka, saffron, honey, eggs, lemon zest, salt, cardamom majado, and the remaining flour in the same bowl. Allow to stand for 10 minutes after mixing.
    4. Knead by hand or with a robot in intervals of 1-2 minutes with intermediate rests of 10-15 minutes; we do it a couple of times to develop gluten before adding all of the butter. Before adding it, the dough is quite dry.
    5. While the dough is rising, we prepare the cans that will serve as molds. The canned tomatoes in the photos are 400 g in size. If you can find them in larger sizes, that's even better. We'll soak them in hot water to get the label off. With a laugh, the remaining glue is removed. The cans are thoroughly cleaned both inside and out.
    6. It is not necessary to use cans to make the kulich, but if we use another mold, such as a panettone mold, they will not come out as high or with their distinctive appearance. The size of the base is determined by cutting a circle of baking paper. The walls are lined with another piece of paper that protrudes a couple of inches from the can's edge.
    7. Continue kneading after adding the butter in batches until it is completely absorbed. We continue kneading the dough until it is thin and elastic. We roll it into a ball, place it in a greased bowl, cover it, and let it wash.
    8. When the dough has folded, we transfer it to the countertop and thoroughly crush it to wear it down. We cut it into a rectangle and distribute the stumbles above. We divided the dough into two equal parts and stacked one on top of the other. We make a roll out of the dough and knead it lightly to distribute the stumbles.
    9. We weigh and divide our dough. We'll need a quarter of this money to fill these small cans. If we have large cans, 1 kg or 800 g, we can use half of the dough; that is, if we have small cans, we will get four buns and large cans will give us two buns. You can see that I used two small cans and then placed the remaining half of the dough in a medium panettone mold. It's not as authentic, but it works.
    10. We roll each portion into a ball and place it in the can; the mass should be about half the height. Cover the molds with plastic wrap and set aside until the dough has doubled in volume.
    11. Cook the kulich for 30 minutes in an oven preheated to 190oC (without air). If we brown them too much in the final stretch, we can cover them with aluminum foil. When they're done, we take them out and wait five minutes to get them out of the cans because they're very soft at first. Using a cloth to cover the can, we lay it down and carefully pull the paper to remove the bun. Allow the kulich to cool on the side of a grid.
    12. Once the buns are very cold, we make the glaze in a bowl by mixing the icing sugar and lemon juice with a fork until it has a pourable consistency while thickening. We glaze the cocorota of the buns and sprinkle them with the ornaments that we like best. It is customary to place them in a confeti of colorines.

Nutrition Information

Yield

16

Serving Size

1

Amount Per Serving Calories 247Total Fat 9gSaturated Fat 4gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 4gCholesterol 40mgSodium 70mgCarbohydrates 40gFiber 2gSugar 18gProtein 4g

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